SanDiego350’s Youth4Climate Summer Camp

By: Hannah Riggins, SD350 Youth Volunteer

SanDiego350 recently launched the Youth4Climate (Y4C) Summer Camp to introduce climate activism techniques while allowing campers to discover their people, power, and passion. Designed for high school and college-level students, Y4C was first conceived in May, during the initial COVID lockdown, and is currently halfway through its second session of the 2020 Summer. The planning team consists of a diverse group of adult and youth volunteers, with each separate committee spearheaded by at least one youth activist responsible for administering weekly meetings and delegating tasks to other committee members.

Y4C Structure:

The curriculum development team, led by Kate Vedder, develops the goals and weekly content, as well as the assigned projects, discussion questions, challenges, and journal prompts. Managed by Izzy Lee, the production team produces educational webinars and complementary promotional videos. Meanwhile, Adelka Hancova’s promotional team generates social media content and supplementary materials. Meisha Meyers and Alexa Castruita, youth volunteers, and Jennifer Phelps, an adult volunteer, organize the Sunday meetings as the leaders of the overall coordination and volunteer coordination team.

Y4C Camper Experience:

By the official start date for Session 1 (June 29, 2020), 39 individuals had registered. Each camper began the 4-week session with a welcome packet. The packets were designed with each detail thoughtfully considered, down to the 100% recyclable packaging. In each packet, campers discovered SD350’s custom DIY Handbook – “Fight like a climate activist”, as well as “sneak-peeks” of the week ahead, from positive energy tea to herbaceous plant clippings. Certain items in the welcome packet symbolized an aspect of how we as humans are connected to the Earth. Guided emotional resilience exercises, inspired by Joana Macy’s teachings, empowered campers to use their connections to each other and to the Earth to channel passion toward climate activism. The exercise included deep breathing and a focus on self-compassion.

Y4C Impact:

Youth are often susceptible to burnout, facing many stress-inducing pressures of contemporary life alongside the ordinary difficulties of coming of age. The primary goal of Y4C is to help youth climate activists find their place within the movement. For that reason, the content design team placed extra emphasis on emotional resilience. Another key goal of Y4C is to cultivate an environment in which campers can build a network of relationships. Y4C wants young climate activists to know that they are not alone—that their voice is heard—and intentionally connects them with peer activists.

Kate Vedder, a rising senior at Point Loma High School, stated that, “It is so amazing to be surrounded by passionate activists and to be in this community the camp has created. This camp is extremely empowering and has shown me how to be the best climate activist I can be!”

Alexa Castruita, a rising junior at Hilltop High School in Chula Vista, wrote that, “joining the planning group and actually being a part of the camp has opened up my eyes to so many perspectives on the world and has helped me develop more empathy for people. The camp is an amazing way to learn and advance in your education of important issues.”

Session 2 kicked off in early August and includes roughly 50 campers from 6 states. We will do what we can to continue the momentum in these unprecedented times, knowing that we are all in this together.

Explore Y4C: Website; Instagram; Youtube.

Food Vision 2030

What’s your food vision for San Diego County? What food issues do you care about? Share your thoughts on the FV2030 community engagement platform!

By: David Pearl, SD350 Food & Soil Committee Member

Our friends at the San Diego Food System Alliance are hard at work on Food Vision 2030, a plan for transforming San Diego County’s food system over the next ten years. In their own words, “The goal of Food Vision 2030 is to inform planning, policy, program, and investment opportunities that improve the food system in San Diego County.”

SDFV2030 is now in the community engagement phase, and they want to hear from you! Visit the community engagement platform to provide feedback on the region’s food system and what you would like to see reflected in the ultimate vision.

If you want to focus on the intersection between climate and food, there is a section specifically for that.

We hope you’ll take the time to make your voice heard.

Plant-Based Meal Recipe

Looking to incorporate plant based meals into your diet? This quick dish is a great and customizable combination of familiar and yummy foods- ‘no-meat’ balls over pasta and oven-roasted veggies with a balsamic twist. Recipe below:

VEGGIES (serves 4-5):

1 onion, 2 zucchini, 2 red bell pepper, 2 eggplants *any combination of your favorite veggies is possible — (green beans and broccoli would also be great in this), 2 tbsp olive or avocado oil, salt, pepper, fresh or dried herbs (thyme, oregano, celery, basil, etc.), balsamic vinegar


1. Preheat oven to 400F

2. Slice onion and zucchini into half moons, eggplant into sliced quarters, and red bell peppers into strips. Toss with oil and spices.

3. Cook for 20 minutes and take out to flip veggies. Cook another 20 minutes, take out to do the same. 

4. After 40 minutes or when veggies begin to caramelize, bring over to 300F and cook for 10-15 minutes. 

5. Remove from oven and finish with balsamic vinegar. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving. 


NO-MEAT BALLS (serves 4-5): 1/2 c cooked and cooled quinoa, 2 tbsp nutritional yeast, 1 can beans of choice (white beans used in this recipe, black beans work too), 1/4 c flour of choice, salt, pepper, 2 tbsp ketchup, tomato paste, or barbecue sauce, 1/2 tbsp sriracha (optional), 1/4 cup sesame, hemp, flax, or chia seeds, 1 tsp garlic powder, herbs (oregano, thyme, basil, parsley, etc.)


1. Preheat oven to 400F

2. Drain beans and use a fork to mash them in a bowl.

3. Mix in all other ingredients well. 

4. Scoop mixture into desired sized balls and place on a baking sheet.

5. Cook in oven for 30-40 minutes, or until crispy.


PASTA: Your choice, but @sprouts and @banza have great protein pasta options that boost the nutritional quality of this dish and keep you fuller for longer. 


Serve and enjoy! This dish is great with pesto, or sub the balsamic for marinara sauce. Let us know in the comments if you tried it and what you think!

By: Maddie McMurray


SanDiego350 Educates Southwest High School Students on Urgency of Climate Action

Originally published by the San Diego Free Press on April 30th 2018
By Susan Huntington Bishop

Left to Right: Bev Harju, Michelle Roberts, Ron Schneider, Susan Bishop
Photo courtesy of a student of Michelle Roberts

SanDiego350’s Presentation Team has been busy spreading the word about climate change throughout communities in the San Diego area. Team volunteers Beverly Harju, Ron Schneider, and Nancy Cottingham spent April 11th with students in Michelle Roberts’ Biology classes at Southwest High School. Michelle is a SanDiego350 member and is dedicated to teaching the next generation about the serious issues facing our planet and the concrete steps they can take toward building solutions.
[Read more…]

A Look at Climate Change Effects On San Diego County

Originally published by the San Diego Free Press on December 6th 2017
By Cynthia Wootton and Angela Deegan / SanDiego350

A  recent presentation by Dr. Veerabhadran Ramanathan of UCSD’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography on climate change held locally (at the San Diego City Council Environment Committee meeting), made us wonder what climate change might look like here in San Diego County.

Typically, weather events will conform to two characteristics of climate change: more extreme and, generally, more frequent weather events. [Read more…]

Climate Change Lawsuits and Coastal Plans — Where Does San Diego Stand?

By Stephanie Corkran / SanDiego350
Originally published by the San Diego Free Press on October 27th 2017

Image of San Diego skyline viewed from Coronado, but with Coronado under water from sea level rise

Coronado Island in 2300 if sea level rises by 12 feet; Nickolay Lamm/StorageFront.com, Data: Climate Central

San Francisco, Oakland, San Mateo, Marin and Imperial Beach are suing fossil fuel companies over the sea level rise and expected property damages to homes and businesses. The claims cite increased cost of infrastructure, emergency response, coastal flooding and extreme storms. Danger to health and the obstruction of free use of property and free passage of waterways and parks is included.

[Read more…]

SanDiego350 Climate Presentation at Lions Club – National City

By Mônica Prado, SanDiego350 

On August 31st, the SanDiego350 Presentation Team shared with members of a local Lions Club in National City what we can do together to solve the climate crisis. Presenters Nancy Cottingham and Beverly Harju explained what climate change is and how we, as individuals and collectively, can act towards reducing fossil fuels emissions.  The presentation was organized by Larry Emerson, a National City resident and SanDiego350 volunteer, with the support of National City Host Lions Club.

Nancy Cottingham presenting at National City Lion’s Club, Photo by Mônica Prado

[Read more…]

State Legislative Initiatives on Climate You’ll Want to Support

By James Ferguson, SanDiego350

We have known for 50 years or more now that the effect of releasing millions of years of biologically-captured carbon into the atmosphere through the burning of fossil fuels would trap infrared heat radiation. According to James Hansen, formerly the top climate scientist at NASA, our climate is stable when the level of carbon dioxide does not exceed 350 ppm in earth’s atmosphere.

SanDiego350’s Climate Legislation training, July 2017, Hillcrest – Photo by Olga Cortes

This Summer, monitoring stations in the mid-Pacific measured net carbon concentrations at an average of over 400 ppm! This increase in the level of CO2 has raised the average global temperature by 1° Celsius since the dawn of the industrial revolution, with another 0.5° Celsius locked in from greenhouse gases already emitted (due to the lag between when greenhouse gases are emitted and resultant temperature rise). [Read more…]

PRESENT AT THE CREATION

By Ron Bonn, SanDiego350

Originally published in the San Diego Free Press on 4/20/2017

You could say I was present at the creation.

Looking back in our lives, we rarely know exactly when something started. But regular television news coverage of man-made climate change, with all it implies, started on New Year’s Day, 1970.

Ron Bonn

Ron Bonn, courtesy of the author

The staff of “The CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite”: producers, writers, technicians; a couple dozen of us in all, were sitting around the newsroom waiting for something to happen—because nothing happens on New Year’s Day—when the man himself stormed in. “Goddamn it,” he said to us, “we’ve got to do something about this environment story.”

You might guess that when Walter Cronkite said, “Goddamn it,” things happened at CBS News. And what happened is that I, the science producer for “The Evening News,” was detached for eight weeks to “do something” about this environment story. Never before, to my knowledge, had a network spot news program paid that much attention to a non-breaking story. [Read more…]

Why I Am An Activist, #4

By Amy Knight, SanDiego350

It started when I began volunteering my Saturdays. It progressed when I got excited about giving up entire Saturdays. The feeling seemed all too familiar, but new. A laser-like focus, inexhaustible, melting hours away as if they were minutes. A flush of excitement came to my face whenever ice core records were mentioned.

Okay, maybe ice cores aren’t your thing. But, odds are that everyone has experienced these feelings in some way, about something. Perhaps it’s when floating on a surfboard, about to catch the next wave, or when about to take down a chess rival. It could even happen to some while tackling the intricacies of a tax return. If you’re getting a big return, that is…

I get that feeling when I’m teaching the science of climate change.

Amy teaching children about the ocean

Teaching children about the ocean. Photo courtesy of the author.

I didn’t magically wake up one morning and realize this was my passion. I realized it at 3:06 PM on a Saturday while listening to a University of Miami climate scientist explain the biogeochemical processes of ocean acidification. This was supposed to be my day off. Why was I here? Why was it transporting me so?

A year ago, I was teaching high school Psychology in Miami, Florida. My students were from predominantly low socioeconomic, minority communities sitting literally at ground zero for bearing the economic and social impacts of climate change. I’d spent the previous two years involved with Climate Leadership Engagement Opportunities (CLEO) outside of school hours, learning the science behind climate change and helping teachers incorporate climate change into their curriculum. The hours were long, the scientific concepts demanding, and the political climate in Florida somewhat short of supportive. [Read more…]